Baseball Is Always Looking For Ways To Keep The Sport Interesting And What Better Way But To Hit Many Home Runs

Baseball the sport that has always been my passion. When I was a youngster I breathed and talked base ball. I was going to play for the New York Yankees of course and I acted the part but naturally I was not acting, I was playing for real. When school recessed for the summer my parents knew exactly where I was from morning to night, no I am not over exaggerating. I was lucky to be living across from a baseball field and my friends would ring the doorbell in the morning and make sure I was ready to go on the baseball field. Hit and field all day long and sometimes play a game among ourselves. Hitting the ball into the trees in our case was a feeling only a youngster with the love of baseball can understand. The excitement of watching a home run itself was not only for the player of the game but it also became an expectancy for the fan. I would say the home run became a very popular version of the game when Babe Ruth converted from being a pitcher to a hitter with the Boston Red Soxs when he was traded to the New York Yankees. Since then the home run has excited crowds with the ultimate achievement and the home run was always there to save the sport of baseball.

The following was posted by Dylan Gwinn, published by Breitbart: “Then again, it’s often said that baseball did create the conditions necessary for the power surge in the summer of 1998, by turning a blind eye and a deaf ear to the rampant and obvious steroid abuse that was taking place in clubhouses throughout the league.”

“So how is it then? That over twenty years later, with the “steroid era” a supposed relic of baseball’s past, that some of baseball’s longest standing home run records are falling like dominoes?”

“While there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that younger, powerful hitters are also leaving their mark on the game. One only needs to look at these numbers provided earlier this year by Sports Illustrated’s Tom Verducci, to see that the baseball itself is behaving differently than we’ve ever seen before.”

“Through July 4th, there were eight home runs hit at 90 MPH or less, versus only three in 2018. However, on balls hit hard, 450 feet or farther, the ball being used in 2019 greatly outperformed the 2018 ball. Through July 4th of this year, there were 100 home runs hit 450 feet or farther. In 2018, during the entire season, there were only 82 home runs hit that hard.”

“None of this is to take away from the skill of the modern hitter. Yes, MLB players have adjusted to the high four-seam fastball. Yes, MLB is currently fielding a whole generation of players schooled in an upward swing that happens to be timed perfectly to combat modern pitching.”

“However, whether it’s the centering of the pill inside the baseball, the slickness of the leather, or any other real or imagined change, the 2019 baseball is behaving far differently than its predecessors, and it’s leading to historic numbers of home runs.”

I guess owners will always involve themselves on how to get more home runs produced for the benefit of having fans come out to the game except the era of steroids which was a bad time for baseball and fans are still arguing the fact if it was a big deal or not for its use. I always felt baseball was one sport you could go to with out seeing artificial means to produce. That era is done with and I hope it stays that way. Mickey Mantle of a past Yankee team did not need any artificial means of hitting a home run, why he just hit the balls out of the stadiums. Thats how I always want to remember the game of baseball!

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